Plural of Energy

The Quick Answer
"Energy" is a mass noun. It has no plural form.

Be aware, however, that as well as meaning "power" in a general sense, the word "energy" can also relate to different types of power (e.g., a person's physical and mental powers). In such a context, the plural "energies" can be used.

The Plural of Energy

Energy is a mass noun. It has no plural form.
  • The Sun is the source of energy for life on Earth.
  • I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. (Duke Ellington)

"Energies" Is Possible but Rare

When "energy" relates to different types of power (e.g., a person's physical and mental powers), the plural form "energies" can be used.
  • The group functions well because it takes its motivation from different energies.
  • Training gives us an outlet for suppressed energies created by stress and thus tones the spirit just as exercise conditions the body. (Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger)
The table below shows the standard rules for forming the plurals of nouns in English.

Type Example of Type Forming the Plural Plural
Most Nouns cat
scythe
add s cats
scythes
Noun Ending s, sh, ch, x or z bus
dress
add es buses
dresses
Nouns ending [consonant] o mango
zero
tomato
add either s or es
(There are no rules for this - you have to know.)
mangoes or mangos
zeros
tomatoes
Nouns ending [vowel] o patio
ratio
add s patios
ratios
Nouns ending [consonant] y story
penny
energy
change the y to an i and add es stories
pennies
energies (uncommon)
Nouns ending [vowel] y storey ()
donkey
add s storeys
donkeys
Mass nouns energy
rice
some nouns do not have a plural form
energy
rice
Nouns ending f or fe dwarf
knife
ves and/or s
(There are no rules - you have to know.)
dwarfs
knives
Exceptions goose
louse
some nouns undergo a vowel or letters change geese
lice
More exceptions salmon
sheep
some nouns do not change at all salmon
sheep

Why Is There Confusion over the Plural of Energy?

Confusion arises because, in its most common meaning, energy is a mass noun. A mass noun is a noun without a plural form. They refer to items that can't be counted (e.g., music, milk, chalk).

See Also

Unusual pluralsPlural forming table Quirks with forming plurals Forming the plurals of abbreviations Forming the plurals of compound nouns