Too or To?

by Craig Shrives

Too or To?

What is the difference between "too" and "to"?

"Too" has two meanings:
  • (1) "Too" means "as well." For example:
    • Your eye is swollen. Your lip is swollen too.
  • (2) "Too" conveys the idea of "in excess." For example:
    • Your cat is too fat.
"To" also has two means

More about "Too" and "To"

There is often confusion over the words "too" and "to." Both words have two uses. This infographic summarizes the different uses of "to" and "too:

too and to explained

Click on the Two Correct Sentences
(Interactive Game)

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Examples with "Too"

Here are some example sentences with "too":

Examples with "too" meaning "as well" or "also".
  • I can do it too.
  • Did you think that too?
Read more about too meaning as well or also.

Examples with "too" meaning "in excess" or "more than it should be".
  • This cat is too chubby.
  • The shoes were too expensive.
  • I'm glad to hear you smoke. A man should always have an occupation of some kind. There are far too many idle men in London as it is. (Playwright Oscar Wilde)
Read more about too meaning in excess.

Examples with "To"

Here are some example sentences with "to":

Examples with "to" in expressions like "to walk," "to run," "to paint," etc.
  • I want to run around the planet.
  • Did you tell her what to think?
  • I'm glad to hear you smoke. A man should always have an occupation of some kind. There are far too many idle men in London as it is. (Playwright Oscar Wilde)
(These are all verbs in their infinitive forms.)

Read more about to show the infinitive form.

Examples with "to" in expressions like "to the park," "to the postman," and "agree to a proposal."
  • She handed the parcel to the stranger.
  • I am going to the park.
(The word "to" in these examples is a preposition.)

Read more about to used as a preposition.

Common Terms with "Too" and "To"

Here are some common terms with "too":
  • too little too late
  • too much
  • too often
  • too old / young
Here are some common terms with "to":
  • to go
  • to whom it may concern
  • To err is human; to forgive is divine.
Here's a sentence with all four versions of "too/to":
  • I too was too old to be preached to.
What Is the Infinitive Form?


Verbs are doing words (e.g., "to dance," "to sit," "to fly," "to think").

When "to" is in front of a verb, the verb is said to be in its infinitive form.
  • She likes to dance.
  • (This is the verb "to dance" in its infinitive form.)
  • She dances.
  • (This is the verb "to dance" not in its infinitive form.)
Read more about verbs.

What Is a Preposition?


The word "to" is a preposition. Prepositions show the relationship between at least two words in a sentence.
  • He agreed to the proposal.
    ("To" shows the relationship between "agreed" and "proposal.")
  • David ran to the park.
  • ("To" shows the relationship between "ran" and "park.")
Words like "on," "in," and "by" are also prepositions. There are lots of others.

Read more about prepositions.

A Video Summary

Here is a short video summarizing the difference between "Too" and "To."

Interactive Exercise
Here are three randomly selected questions from a larger exercise, which can be edited, printed to create an exercise worksheet, or sent via email to friends or students.

See Also

Take a different test on too and to adverse or averse? affect or effect? appraise or apprise? avenge or revenge? bare or bear? complement or compliment? dependant or dependent? discreet or discrete? disinterested or uninterested? e.g. or i.e.? envy or jealousy? imply or infer? its or it's? material or materiel? poisonous or venomous? practice or practise? principal or principle? tenant or tenet? who's or whose? What are nouns? What are verbs? List of easily confused words