Saw, Soar, and Sore

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Saw, Soar, and Sore

What is the difference between "saw," "soar," and "sore"?

Saw
  • "Saw" is the simple past tense of "to see."
  • "A saw" is a hand tool for cutting wood or other hard materials.
  • "To saw" means to cut something with a saw.
Soar
  • "To soar" means to maintain height in the air without flapping wings or using engine power.
Sore
  • "A sore" is a raw and painful place on the body.
  • "Sore" is an adjective meaning painful or aching.
saw, soar, and sore

Saw, Soar, Sore

Even though "saw," "soar," and "sore" sound identical, their meanings are quite different (i.e., they're homonyms).

Saw

Saw is the simple past tense of the verb "to see." The past participle is "seen."

"A saw" is a noun that describes a tool with a serrated blade used for cutting wood or other hard materials. The verb "to saw" means to cut something with a saw. The past tense of "to saw" is "sawed."

Example sentences with "saw":
  • I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free. (Sculptor Michelangelo)
  • Egyptian saws were made of serrated, hardened copper which cut on both pull and push strokes.
  • When cutting wood along the grain, you should saw at a 60 degree angle to the material.

Soar

The verb "to soar" means to maintain height in the air without flapping wings or using engine power. "To soar" also means to reach great heights. It is commonly seen in the phrase "soaring prices."

Example sentences with "soar":
  • Don't just fly, soar. (Dumbo)
  • There is an eagle in me that wants to soar, and there is a hippopotamus in me that wants to wallow in the mud. (Poet Carl Sandburg)

Sore

The noun "sore" is a raw and painful place on the body. The adjective "sore" means painful or aching. When used figuratively, "sore" is most commonly seen in the following phrases:
  • sore winner
  • sore loser
  • sore spot
  • to stick/stand out like a sore thumb
  • a sight for sore eyes
Example sentences with "sore":
  • I make sure I'm smiling every day, I'm laughing every day, no matter how sore or achy I am. (Wrestler Booker T)
  • (Here, "sore" is an adjective.)
  • The virus is spread from person to person by kissing or another close contact with sores.
  • (Here, "sore" is a noun.)
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See Also

adverse or averse? affect or effect? Ms., Miss, or Mrs? avenge or revenge? bare or bear? complement or compliment? dependant or dependent? discreet or discrete? disinterested or uninterested? e.g. or i.e.? envy or jealousy? imply or infer? its or it's? material or materiel? poisonous or venomous? practice or practise? principal or principle? tenant or tenet? who's or whose? What are nouns? What are verbs? List of easily confused words