Go for Broke (Origin)

What Is the Origin of the Saying "Go for Broke"?

The term "go for broke" means to gamble everything you have.

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Go for Broke (Origin)

Examples of Use:

  • When it comes to achieving your dreams, sometimes you have to go for broke and take risks.
  • In the final minutes of the game, the team decided to go for broke and put all their effort into scoring a winning goal.
  • She decided to go for broke and quit her stable job to pursue her passion for art.
  • With nothing to lose, he decided to go for broke and start his own business, fully dedicating himself to its success.
  • They knew the competition would be tough, but they were determined to go for broke and give it their all in the performance.
The term "go for broke" originates from gambling and means to place all of your money on a bet in an all-or-nothing gamble. It has been in common usage since the 1940s. (The word "broke" is a synonym for "bankrupt.")

The saying was popularized by the 1951 film "Go for Broke!", which is a black-and-white war film that dramatizes the real-life story of a combat team from the US 442nd Infantry Regiment. Of interest, the 442nd Infantry Regiment was composed of Nisei, second-generation Americans born of Japanese parents. (NB: "Go for broke" is the 442nd's motto.)

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This page was written by Craig Shrives.