Using a Comma after an Interjection (Grammar Lesson)
 
Commas are used to offset interjections (e.g., yes, indeed, absolutely). Interjections are included in a sentence (usually at the start) to express a sentiment such as surprise, disgust, joy, excitement, or enthusiasm. For example:

  • Yes, I've won.
  • Indeed, you have.
An interjection at the start of sentence can also be followed by an exclamation mark to make it more impactful. For example:

  • Yes! I've won.
 

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Using a Comma after an Interjection

Expressions such as yes, no and indeed (usually at the start of a sentence) are known as interjections.

When at the start of a sentence, an interjection can be followed by a comma or an exclamation mark. For example (interjections shaded):

  • Well, the rain has played its part in the outcome of this match.

  • Yes, she will apologize.

  • Absolutely, a fifth of all the students live in the village.
If an interjection appears in the middle of a sentence, offset it with commas. If it appears at the end, offset it with a comma.

Examples:

  • The office can handle, well, four hundred applications per day.

  • It's cold, indeed.
 
WHAT ARE INTERJECTIONS?

Interjections are words used to express strong feeling or sudden emotion. They are included in a sentence — usually at the start — to express a sentiment such as surprise, disgust, joy, excitement, or enthusiasm.

Read more about interjections.
 
 
A COMMA OR AN EXCLAMATION MARK?

An interjection can be followed by a comma or an exclamation mark. An exclamation mark gives the interjection more impact. For example:

  • No, it's not yours.
  • No! It's not yours.
  • (The No is more impactful with an exclamation mark. When an interjection is followed by an exclamation mark, it is common for the sentence to be an exclamatory sentence, i.e., to end with an exclamation mark as well.)
  • No! It's not yours!
INTERJECTIONS ARE NOT USUALLY USED IN BUSINESS WRITING

Interjections are usually only used when spoken words are being quoted. You should avoid them in business writing.
 

See also:

What are interjections?
Commas after a sentence introductions
Commas after a transitional phrase
Commas before conjunctions (and, or, but)
Commas for parenthesis
Commas in lists
Commas with a long subject
Commas with numbers
Commas with quotation (speech) marks
Commas with the vocative case
Commas with Dear, Hello, and Hi
List of easily confused words