What Is an Independent Clause? (with Examples)
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What Is an Independent Clause? (with Examples)

An independent clause is a clause that can stand alone as a sentence (i.e., it expresses a complete thought).

An independent clause, like all clauses, has a subject and verb.

When there are no dependent clauses in the same sentence an independent clause, the independent clause is a simple sentence. For example:

  • I like coconut macaroons.
  • (This is an independent clause and simple sentence.)
  • I like coconut macaroons even though I dislike coconut.
  • (This is an independent clause and a dependent clause. This is a complex sentence.)

Examples of Independent Clauses

Here are some examples of independent clauses (shaded). Notice how they could stand alone as sentences. (This is the difference between an independent clause and a dependent clause.)

  • Life is something that happens when you can't get to sleep. (Fran Lebowitz)

  • The best defense against the atom bomb is not to be there when it goes off. (Anon)

  • I have enough money to last me the rest of my life, unless I buy something. (Jackie Mason)

  • Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there. (Will Rogers, 1879-1935)

  • My one regret in life is that I am not someone else. (Woody Allen)
USE A COMMA BEFORE A CONJUNCTION THAT JOINS TWO INDEPENDENT CLAUSES

Writers are often unsure whether to use a comma before a coordinate conjunction (i.e., a word like and and but). You should use a comma before a coordinate conjunction that joins two independent clauses. For example:

  • Toby is smart, and punctual.
  • He is smart, and he is punctual. (There is a comma before and because it joins two independent clauses.)
Read more about commas before conjunctions.
THE MAIN TYPES OF SENTENCE

A sentence with two or more independent clauses is called a compound sentence. Here are the basic types of sentence with the independent clauses shaded:

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