What Is a Compound Predicate? (with Examples)

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What Is a Compound Predicate? (with Examples)

The predicate is the part of the sentence that makes a statement about the subject. The predicate usually tells us what the subject is doing or what is happening to the subject.

A compound predicate tells us two (or more) things about the same subject (without repeating the subject).

This is a simple predicate:
  • Adam lives in Bangor.
  • (This tell us just one thing about the subject (Adam). This is not a compound predicate.)

Examples of Compound Predicates

These are examples of compound predicates:
  • Adam lives in Bangor and speaks Welsh.
  • (This tell us two things about the subject (Adam).)
  • The telegram was late but contained exciting news.
  • They need to absorb nitrogen and keep above 20 degrees.

There Is One Subject in a Compound Predicate

A compound predicate tells us at least two things about one subject. So, the following sentence is not an example of a compound predicate:
  • Adam lives in Bangor, and he speaks Welsh.
  • (This is a compound sentence. It has two subjects (Adam and he). Each subject has one simple predicate.)
The following sentence is an example of a compound predicate:
  • Adam and his brother live in Bangor and speak Welsh.
  • (The predicate tell us two things about the subject (Adam and his brother). Even though it has two elements, this is one subject. It is called a compound subject.)
There is often confusion over whether to use a comma before a conjunction (i.e., a word like and and but). It is worth being able to spot a compound sentence because you should use a comma before a conjunction that joins two independent clauses. For example:
  • He is smart, and articulate.
  • He is smart, and he is articulate.
Read more about commas before conjunctions.
 
 


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