Tenant or Tenet?

Our most common search themes:
apostrophe
semicolon
adjective
verb


What is the difference between tenant and tenet?

Tenant is a person who rents land or property. For example:
  • The tenants in the apartment above us are too noisy.
Tenet is a principle on which a belief or theory is based. For example:
  • Non-violence is the central tenet of their faith.

Tenant or Tenet?

The words tenant and tenet sound similar, but their meanings are completely different.

Tenant

The noun tenant describes a person who occupies land or property that is rented from a landlord. Though not as common, tenant can also be used as a verb. For example:
  • My tenant never washes his hair.
  • (Here, tenant is a noun.)
  • We are only tenants, and shortly the great Landlord will give us notice that our lease has expired. (Joseph Jefferson)
  • She tenants the land from a farmer.
  • (Here, tenant is a verb.)

Tenet

The noun tenet denotes an adopted belief, theme, or principle.

Examples:
  • Trust is the central tenet of our agreement.
  • The phrase "Love your enemies" is not always an easy tenet to live by. (Lea Salonga)
  • My views have evolved to support marriage equality. They do not require a religion to alter any of its tenets; it simply forbids government from discrimination regarding who can marry whom. (Tim Johnson)
 
 




What are adjectives? What are nouns? List of easily confused words

More Free Help...

All the lessons and tests on Grammar Monster are free. Here's some more free help:

Follow Us on Twitter Follow us on Twitter
Like us on Facebook Follow us on Facebook
by Craig Shrives Follow us on Google+
mail tip Sign up for our daily tip emails
Chat about grammar Ask a grammar question
Search Search this site

Buy Some Help...

Too busy to read everything on Grammar Monster? Here are the paid services we recommend to learn grammar and to keep your writing error free:

Paste your text into Grammarly's online interface for corrections and recommendations. (Free trial available)

Press F2 while using Word, PowerPoint, etc., for corrections and recommendations. (Free trial available)

Send your text to a trained editor and grammar geek for checking. (Free trial available)

Learn English (or another language) with a state-of-the-art program. (Free trial available)

Buy Our Book...

Buy "Grammar Rules: Writing with Military Precision" by Craig Shrives (founder of Grammar Monster).


More info...