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prophecy and prophesy - the difference

The Quick Answer
A prophecy is knowledge of the future (from a divine source).
To prophesy means to predict the future (with divine inspiration).

Prophecy

The word prophecy is a noun. (The last syllable of prophecy is pronounced sea.) A prophecy is knowledge of the future - usually said to have come from a divine source.

Examples:
  • On the second day of the course, we will study the prophecies of Nostradamus.
  • The prophet has revealed his latest prophecy in which three cities are razed to the ground.

Prophesy

The word prophesy is a verb. (The last syllable of prophesy is pronounced sigh.) To prophesy means to predict the future - usually with divine inspiration.

Examples:
  • He prophesies a great war between East and West.
  • He prophesied that a flood would cover the Earth.
  • (This is an example of to prophesy in the past tense.)
Beware

Not Prophesize or Prophesise 

I prophesy
You prophesy
He prophesies
We prophesy
You prophesy
They prophesy

There is no such word as prophesize or prophesise. This is most commonly seen as:

He prophesizes
(should be prophesies)
Quick Test