loath and loathe - the difference

Our most common search themes:
apostrophe
semicolon
adjective
verb


To loathe means to hate.
Loath means unwilling.

Writers occasionally confuse loath and loathe. Their meanings are related as they both relate to not liking something.

Loathe

Loathe is a verb meaning to hate. In fact, many consider it even stronger than to hate.  It can also be translated as to hate intensely.

Examples:
  • She will eat just about anything, but she loathes celery.
  • I loved the Army as an institution and loathed every single thing it required me to do.

Loath

Loath is an adjective meaning unwilling.

Examples:
  • She is loath to join because her friends play for a rival team.
  • Magazines and newspapers are loath to discuss these types of deals publicly.
  • At daybreak, when loathe to rise, have this thought in thy mind: I am rising for a man's work.
  • (should be loath)
Select the correct version:

 

EVEN IN SPEECH

People confuse loathe and loath even when talking. Note:
  • Loathe ends in a soft th sound. It rhymes with betroth.
  • Loath ends in a hard th sound. It rhymes with the oath or both.




What are adjectives? What are verbs? List of easily confused words

More Free Help...

All the lessons and tests on Grammar Monster are free. Here's some more free help:

Follow Us on Twitter Follow us on Twitter
Like us on Facebook Follow us on Facebook
by Craig Shrives Follow us on Google+
mail tip Sign up for our daily tip emails
Chat about grammar Ask a grammar question
Search Search this site

Buy Some Help...

Too busy to read everything on Grammar Monster? Here are the paid services we recommend to learn grammar and to keep your writing error free:

Paste your text into Grammarly's online interface for corrections and recommendations. (Free trial available)

Press F2 while using Word, PowerPoint, etc., for corrections and recommendations. (Free trial available)

Send your text to a trained editor and grammar geek for checking. (Free trial available)

Learn English (or another language) with a state-of-the-art program. (Free trial available)

Buy Our Book...

Buy "Grammar Rules: Writing with Military Precision" by Craig Shrives (founder of Grammar Monster).


More info...