Bazaar or Bizarre?

Our most common search themes:
apostrophe
semicolon
adjective
verb


What is the difference between bazaar and bizarre?

A bazaar is a market. (The word derives from the Middle East.) For example:
  • I visited a bustling bazaar when I was in Turkey.
Bizarre means strange or eccentric. For example:
  • My father has some bizarre habits.

Bazaar and Bizarre

The words bazaar and bizarre sound similar, but their meanings are very different.

Bazaar

The noun bazaar means a marketplace, usually in the Middle East, where goods and services are exchanged or sold. The term bazaar can also be used to mean a rummage sale.

Examples:
  • Cities such as Isfahan, Golconda, Samarkand, Cairo, Baghdad, and Timbuktu were founded on bazaars.
  • My mother was a wonderful, wonderful woman with a lovely voice who hated housework, hated cooking even more, and loved her children. She was always arranging church activities such as bazaars. (Maureen Forrester)

Bizarre

Bizarre is an adjective describing something unusual or very odd.

Examples:
  • I've got a coin with my face on it. It is really bizarre. (Karen Gillan)
  • There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. (Douglas Adams)
 
 


professional grammar checker


What are nouns? What are adjectives? List of easily confused words
professional grammar checker
Follow Us on Twitter Like us on Facebook by Craig Shrives Search
professional grammar checker

Search Sign Up for Our Free Newsletter
Chat about grammar Ask a Grammar Question